Ostrom land purchase extended

Extension given to secure state capital funds


The Port of Sunnyside has extended the deadline to close a land-purchase deal with Ostrom Mushroom Farms. The company’s Everson plant, pictured, currently employes 300.

Ostrom Mushroom Farms
The Port of Sunnyside has extended the deadline to close a land-purchase deal with Ostrom Mushroom Farms. The company’s Everson plant, pictured, currently employes 300.



— Port of Sunnyside commissioners voted Tuesday to extend the deadline for a land purchase agreement with Ostrom Mushroom Farms during a special meeting Tuesday, March 13.

The delay requested by the company is due to a late-breaking change in the state’s capital funding.

Ostrom’s new deadline is April 16.

The original purchase agreement deadline expired Tuesday, March 13, Port Executive Director Jay Hester said.

The extension follows an announcement the state is allocating an additional $1 million to help the Port of Sunnyside offset the construction of a building off Midvale Road for the Everson-based company.

Sen. Jim Honeyford and Rep. Bruce Chandler had both championed the request for grant money to offset taxes on new construction.

Their efforts helped convince the state to aid the port in obtaining $1 million, Hester said. The funds will be used to help with infrastructure costs.

The Western Washington company is seeking to purchase more than 40 acres of Port of Sunnyside land, according to port records.

Port attorney Rob Faber said the commissioners’ decision to extend the deadline gives both parties the opportunity to make sure the state grant will be used properly.

The new, state-of-the-art $25 million farm will bring 200 year-round jobs to the area, officials said previously.

The Sunnyside location offers access to labor and sources of raw materials, many of which already come from Eastern Washington, officials said.

Ostrom, which has been in mushroom business since 1928, grows a variety of mushrooms — white, crimini and portabella — that are shipped to consumers in the Pacific Northwest, Alaska and Hawaii.

The company currently employs 300 growers, pickers and packers.

Mushrooms are grown entirely indoors to control moisture and temperature, officials said. That allows for harvesting 360 days a year for one of the most stable produce crops available to consumers.



Comments

Comments are subject to moderator review and may not appear immediately on the site.

Please read our commenting policy before posting.

Any comment violating the site's commenting guidelines will be removed and the user could be banned from the site.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment